Feb 3, 2013

Exposure - Yellowstone

Gardiner River, Yellowstone National Park

Yesterday, Theresa and I escaped to our favorite, mid-winter, Yellowstone hot spring. The Boiling River is an underground river, her water warmed by the guts of the earth. Not far from the North Park Entrance, she pokes out her head and tumbles into the icy Gardiner River. This is where we like to sit and boil away our aches and thoughts.

The road there, however, often steals the show. Cruising along the western flank of the Absaroka Mountain Range makes it difficult to drive responsibly. And many critters live in this valley, a valley that aptly took on the name, Paradise, so long ago. It turned out to be an especially good day for wildlife viewing, as we came across herds of Bison, Elk, Deer, and Big Horn Sheep.

Later, while scanning through the hundred or so frames on my camera, I was taken by this male Bighorn pulling at a blade of dry grass. Perhaps it is his satisfaction found in such simplicity that is so alluring.









Here he is again, a few minutes later, with another blade of grass.



Below is photograph that I took later in the day. This is a foam line on the eastern bank of the Yellowstone River. Not far upstream, hot water, from yet another smaller hot spring, trickles into the river. Trout collect here during the winter to dine on hatching midges. Although there were no fly rods in the car this day, we still had to stop for a look.

While peering down into the eddy, bubbles were popping in the blanket of foam. At first I could not tell what was causing the disturbance. But just as I was thinking that is was air pockets from underwater thermals, I saw a dorsal slice through the foam and we looked on with amazement as another, and yet another, sucked down their lunch completely undercover.

Here is a photo of the foam. Can you see the little ripple in the center? In Remembrance: Mr. Midge.



Have a good time,
Duffy & The Gorge Fly Shop

2 comments :

  1. Color me envious. Most important, did you fish to the feeding fish in the foam?

    ReplyDelete

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