Jun 21, 2016

Video - The Wader Makers by Simms


Here is a very well done video highlighting what it takes to build a Premium USA Simms fly fishing waders. It's good to witness the passion and skilled labor that goes into each and every pair of waders. I feel like I can relate to everyone involved in that process in some sort of common thread in life on or off the stream. While there are many less expensive options for waders it's comforting to know that by supporting Simms means I am supporting those who share the same passion and commitment to the sport that I put forth also.


BassProGreg




Gorge Fly Shop Internet Sales Manager | Product Specialist


"Fly Fish the World with Us"

Jun 17, 2016

Sage X Fly Rods - Sneak Preview


Sage introduces for the 2017 model year the New Sage X. X stands for Sage's tenth flagship series of rods. The New X utilizes a new proprietary graphite resin composite developed through exclusive partnerships. Most likely these partnerships relate to the aerospace industry neighbors of the Seattle area. We're talking space age stuff!

Gorge Fly Shop proprietor Travis Duddles was given the opportunity to preview the X firsthand and here in his words is what he has to say about it.

"Compared to the Sage ONE the Sage X is softer, more comfortable with a feeling of deeper loading all the while it rebounds quicker with a positive quick recovery providing a crisp feeling tip which enabled the X to produce incredibly tight loops."

Sage X Graphite/Resin Composites are termed KonneticHD Technology. We've seen the advancements in Konnetic Technology starting with the Sage ONE series and onward to the Circa, Method, SALT, MOD, Little Ones, and the One Trout Spey series of fly rods. Having spent time fishing several of these aforementioned series I am quite comfortable stating that they possess a very real different feeling compared to other graphite's most fly rods are built with today. We can tweak fly rod tapers all we want but I believe we are at the point that if we want to see real advancement we must look to the materials and that is exactly what Sage has done. Sage took the Konnetic Technology and advanced it even further to give us KonneticHD.

The Sage X lineup

A couple things I notice different from Sage ONE specs. Notice we now have a 591-4, 597-4 and a 5101-4. All of these would be 5 weight rods with fighting butts. These have my attention for single handed trout spey applications. Note that all the Switch models are 11 footers. Also note the Spey sizes. Some very interesting additions like the 7140. 

Sage X Single Hand Fly Rods
MODEL
Handle
Length
Line
Tube Size (in)
Weight (oz)
376-4  A 7'6" 3 25 1/2 2 1/8
390-4 A 9'0" 3 30 2 5/16
486-4 A 8'6" 4 28 1/2 2 3/8
490-4 A 9'0" 4 30 2 7/16
4100-4 A 10'0" 4 33 2 7/8
586-4 A 8'6" 5 28 1/2 2 1/2
590-4 A 9'0" 5 30 2 11/16
591-4 B 9'0" 5 30 2 13/16
597-4 B 9'6" 5 31 1/2 2 15/16
5101-4 B 10'0" 5 33 3 1/16
690-4 A 9'0" 6 30 2 13/16
691-4 B 9'0" 6 30 2 15/16
697-4 B 9'6" 6 31 1/2 3 1/8
6101-4 B 10'0" 6 33 3 5/16
790-4 B 9'0" 7 30 3 3/8
796-4 B 9'6" 7 31 1/2 3 1/2
7100-4 B 10'0" 7 33 3 3/4
890-4 B 9'0" 8 30 3 7/16
896-4 B 9'6" 8 31 1/2 3 5/8
8100-4 B 10'0" 8 33 3 4/8
990-4 B 9'0" 9 30 3 11/16
1090-4 B 9'0" 10 30 3 15/16

Sage X Switch Rods
MODEL
Handle
Length
Line
Tube Size (in)
Weight (oz)
6110-4
11'0" 6 36 5 1/2
7110-4
11'0" 7 36 5 3/8
8110-4
11'0" 8 36 5 5/8


Sage X Spey Rods
MODEL
Handle
Length
Line
Tube Size (in)
Weight (oz)
6120-4
12'0" 6
5 11/16
7120-4
12'0" 7
5 15/16
7130-4
13'0" 7
6 5/8
7140-4
14'0" 7
7 1/2
8120-4
12'0" 8
6 1/4
8130-4
13'0" 8
6 3/4
8140-4
14'0" 8
7 3/4
9120-4
12'0" 9
6 9/16
9140-4
14'0" 9 45 3/4 8
10150-4
15'0" 10 49 8 7/8

Sage X Fly Rods are set to release around August 1st, 2016. I'm really looking forward to casting these new rods at IFTD next month in Orlando. Stay tuned for a full report.


BassProGreg




Gorge Fly Shop Internet Sales Manager | Product Specialist


"Fly Fish the World with Us"


Read more of Greg's Post

Jun 12, 2016

Columbia Gorge Fishing Report (06/12/2016)

Columbia Gorge Fishing Report - 06/12/2016

What a gorgeous weekend we have had here, I hope everyone got out to enjoy the cooler weather and great fishing across the area.  Trout fishing is still fantastic in most of the usual spots, summer steelhead are slowly trickling in and bass fishing is as good as it gets.

I know that many of our Deschutes River rainbow trout anglers are not very familiar with hatch cycles and tactics for trout after the stoneflies have waned, but it is not as difficult as one would imagine.  Throw small mayfly nymphs in the morning, look for a hatch around mid-day into the afternoon (it may or may not bring fish to the surface near riffles), start throwing caddis pupae in the late afternoon or early evening (some people fish them all day) and then move onto caddis dries when the sun is no longer on the water.  You can always fish a general attractor dry like a Royal Wulff or a Madam X, and fish are still looking for yellow sallies opportunistically throughout the day, so that is an option if you are not into changing flies all that much.  It is likely not as productive as nymphing, but it is sure a lot easier to plan for.  Another productive strategy is to toss a dead caddis dry early in the morning before the sun is on the water.

Early season on the Klickitat...
Summer steelhead are starting to trickle into the Gorge tributaries.  Still no word on any action on the Deschutes.  The water temps on the Deschutes already reached 72 degrees last week, but they have dropped back down with the cooler weather this week.  

The White River likely caused the lower Deschutes to muddy up too, but again, no one has told us if that happened, it is just typical when it is hot in the area.  The Klickitat was in poor shape last week after all of the hot weather caused the river to muddy up, but it looks decent today (Sunday).  Not a lot of action reported on the Klick, but there are a few fish around and all I need is one.

While we haven't heard of much happening on the Washougal, it is a favorite June steelhead stream for local anglers.

Jim reported to us from the North Umpqua last week.  He fished a dry all day, all week and had one fish come to his dry in four days; but he was super excited about it even though it didn't stick to the hook.  That is the proper attitude of a dedicated steelhead fisherman.  Thanks for the report Jim.

Smallmouth Bass fishing is nothing short of incredible on the John Day.  Poppers all day long...  The Columbia River has been windy and cold most of last week, so we have heard few reports from the usual anglers, but the fish are still in shallow water from the few guys we have talked with.

High mountain lakes are the only places to find a brownie here
My favorite fishing this time of year is to hit the small mountain lakes as soon as the roads are open to get into them.  There are hundreds in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest and dozens in the Mt Hood National Forest that hold nice trout.  While you are unlikely to find ten pound monster rainbows, you will find solitude, beauty and great fishing at any number of out-of-the-way places.

Lost Lake, Laurance Lake, Goose Lake, Clear Lake and Timothy Lake are all bigger lakes in the forest that have good camping and great fishing.  The rest of them shall remain unnamed on this report, but will be there when you find them.

Small streams are fishing well for trout too!  Eagle Creek has been very good, as well as the upper Clackamas, and Trout Lake Creek.  The East Fork Hood was very muddy last week when I went by, but it has cleared up with this cool weather.

Carpin' is another good option, especially when it is sunny, warm and calm.  With carp, it is more about the presentation than the actual fly as long as the fly is in the right ballpark.  They are in every pond and in the main river all throughout the Gorge. Also, we now have a good selection of carp flies...

Flows:  The USGS sites give us real-time flows, while the NOAA site shows us predictions based on weather patterns.  Both are invaluable tools.

Hood River:

Klickitat
USGS
NOAA

Deschutes near Madras:

Deschutes at the mouth:

Columbia River
Bonneville Dam Water Temps
Columbia @ Hood River (The mouth of the Hood backs up at 75 feet)

As always, we are happy to talk fishing any time.  Give us a call if you have any specific questions on local rivers, gear, and tactics, or if you just want some encouragement to get out of the office.  541.386.6977




Andrew Perrault
Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports
Gorge Fly Shop | Product Specialist
541.386.6977


"Fly Fish the World with Us"

Jun 1, 2016

Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports (06/06/2016)

Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports - (06/05/2016)

We hope that everyone if finding some relief from the heat out there.  Fishing is about as hot as the weather is, so find a piece of cool water and get on it.  

Fish rising on a local lake at sunset.
Trout fishing is going well throughout the area.  Small streams are fishing well, the water levels are in generally good shape and the fish are happy.  Eagle Creek, Trout Creek and the East Fork Hood River are some good small streams with scrappy trout in our area that can keep an angler busy all day.  

Lakes are also fishing well for rainbow trout.  Lost Lake has been great.  Flying ants are keeping fish near the surface early and late in the day, while trolling slow and deep during the heat of the day will produce nice fish with consistency.  Goose Lake, Laurance Lake and Kingsley are the usual haunts for locals here and are all fishing well.  

The Deschutes River is still fishing well for rainbow trout.  PMD patterns in the morning, caddis in the afternoon/evening, and stoneflies opportunistically throughout the day.  Try a spent caddis really early in the morning too.  

Summertime rainbows on dries!
No reports of any summer steelhead in the Deschutes, but the Klickitat opened up last week and there were a fish or two caught from what we heard.  It was fairly busy for early June, but most people just wanted to get out on the river as did Ryan and I.  I did hook one steelhead on the swing, but it popped off after ten seconds of glory.  The river is in decent shape as of Sunday morning, but this warm weather can cause some clarity issues in both the Klickitat and the Hood River as glacial melt can dirty up the river pretty quickly in these hot spells.  

The Washougal opened up on Saturday and it tends to produce some nice summer steelhead in June as well as the Sandy and Clackamas.  

Ryan and I spent the early morning hours on Sunday sturgeon fishing with Josh Frederick of Big Fish Guide Service.  June is the best month to catch a true river monster.  Sturgeon in the Columbia can reach over ten feet in length, and the big ones go crazy for the shad that are running in the river now.  While we didn't hook any huge fish, we did catch plenty of smaller fish.  Fishing with Josh is a lot of fun and a good change in pace from trout and steelhead fishing that tends to rule the area.  He has plenty of openings throughout the summer, so don't hesitate to give him a call.  
June is the best month to hook into a giant sturgeon

Speaking of shad, they are running pretty thick now.  Still not really sure how to get them on the fly with ease around here, but it can be done.  People tend to do well upstream near Rufus and near the John Day Dam, as well as off the mouth of the Washougal, but I don't know of any places right here in the gorge that an angler can get them shallow.  

Carp fishing has been turning on.  They are in the shallows feeding heavily throughout the day.  Many of the little ponds on the side of the Columbia are good spots to find carp as well as the main river.  Really, just about any piece of water with slow or little current around here will hold carp.  We have a nice selection of carp flies here in the shop now.  Stop by and check them out.  

Smallmouth bass are still snappy in the Columbia.  The topwater bite has been great early and late in the day, and fish are happy to chase buggers and baitfish patterns.  The weed growth is starting to be an issue, fishing will get a little more difficult in the Columbia over the next month, but for now it is still in good shape. Aquatic plant life can hamper angling efforts when the weeds get thick.  

Throwing a small popper on the John Day should put you into a few dozen bass and it is a wonderful way to get friends and family into fly fishing. 

Flows:  The USGS sites give us real-time flows, while the NOAA site shows us predictions based on weather patterns.  Both are invaluable tools.


Hood River:

Klickitat
USGS
NOAA

Clackamas:

Deschutes near Madras:

Deschutes at the mouth:

Columbia River
Bonneville Dam Water Temps
Columbia @ Hood River (The mouth of the Hood backs up at 75 feet)

As always, we are happy to talk fishing any time.  Give us a call if you have any specific questions on local rivers, gear, and tactics, or if you just want some encouragement to get out of the office.  541.386.6977




Andrew Perrault
Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports
Gorge Fly Shop | Product Specialist
541.386.6977


"Fly Fish the World with Us"


Single Handers and Skaters on vimeo


Dillon Renton from Renton River Adventures and Sterling Dillingham from River Runner Outfitters Fishing for Steelhead in Oregon with single hand Fly rods and Skaters.

Filmed By Tyler Orton and Curtis Ciszek

Edited By Curtis Ciszek

@nwsteelheadanglers

May 29, 2016

Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports (05/29/2016)

Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports (05/29/2016)

Hood River from the Washington side
Fishing is still great throughout the area.  Oregon trout streams are mostly open now as the general trout season started on Saturday, May 28.  This opens the East Fork of the Hood for trout only (it's never open for salmon or steelhead).  Eagle Creek near Bonneville Dam is another nice trout stream that is open near here now.  The West Fork of the Hood is always closed above punchbowl falls...
May and June are the best months to catch a nice brookie!

The Washington small streams are opening either June 1 or the first Saturday in June.  Check the WA regulations.  The Klickitat opens June 1 for trout and steelhead.  Trout Lake Creek is a small trout stream in Washington that is fun to fish and is absolutely gorgeous.  It opens Saturday June 4.


Most area lakes are open now.  Goose Lake, Lost Lake, Laurence Lake, Timothy Lake, Clear Lake and Trillium Lake are some of our local favorites and all are fishing very well right now for rainbow, brown and brook trout (and the occasional cutthroat trout)  There are countless other lakes in the area that are all fishing well now too but not as popular.  Get a map, do some research and get a rod in the water.  A lot of the lakes are inundated with flying ants right now and the fish are gorging on them.  An olive woolly bugger will produce fish all day, as well as Callibaetis nymphs & dries, and some lakes may be holding damselfly nymphs already.

The Deschutes River is still fishing very well for Redband Rainbow Trout.  Just because the salmonflies are done doesnt mean that fishing is any worse than it was when the salmonflies were thick.  It can be very, very good right now.  Anglers just have to change flies, locations and strategies a little more often and they can have just as productive of a day as any.  The strategy starts basically with PMD nymphs in the morning (often doubled with a caddis nymph or stonefly nymph), and the possibility of a hatch late morning in shallow riffles.  Trout are also eating stoneflies, both goldens and yellow sallies opportunistically throughout the day.  They are also eating caddis pupae in the afternoon through evening with a chance at catching fish on caddis dries in the late evening.

Bass fishing is phenomenal right now!
Steelhead fishing is fair to good on the Sandy and the Clackamas, as well as the Kalama.  The Washougal opens June 4 too, and it can be very productive in June.  The Klickitat opens June 1, but is typically not productive until later in the summer.  There are always early fish in all the local rivers, including the Deschutes, but the best strategy for steelhead is to go where the most fish are and right now, the bulk of the summer steelhead are in the lower Columbia tributaries for now.

Smallmouth Bass are biting topwater flies on the Columbia.  Many of the fish in the river spawned recently and are looking for food more than they normally are.  Big fish are still more likely to be caught near the bottom, but fishing is great nonetheless.  The John Day River is fishing well for bass too.  Topwater poppers all day long...

Spring Chinook fishing continues in the area.  The Klickitat, Wind and Hood Rivers are great places to go soak some roe for a fish or two.  Ryan Davey and I spent an hour fishing the other day and got one nice buck that went straight onto the bbq and it was much appreciated by all my neighbors and friends that came over that night.  I fish for salmon for food as it is far, far more productive to use roe than a fly, although fly anglers occasionally catch salmon on the fly around here.

Flows:  The USGS sites give us real-time flows, while the NOAA site shows us predictions based on weather patterns.  Both are invaluable tools.


Hood River:

Klickitat
USGS
NOAA

Clackamas:

Deschutes near Madras:

Deschutes at the mouth:

Columbia River
Bonneville Dam Water Temps
Columbia @ Hood River (The mouth of the Hood backs up at 75 feet)

As always, we are happy to talk fishing any time.  Give us a call if you have any specific questions on local rivers, gear, and tactics, or if you just want some encouragement to get out of the office.  541.386.6977




Andrew Perrault
Columbia Gorge Fishing Reports
Gorge Fly Shop | Product Specialist
541.386.6977


"Fly Fish the World with Us"

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